who we are

ezdoesitClub East is a nonprofit corporation established in 1987 to serve those recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. The Club provides a safe, well-maintained facility for those wishing to recover. We provide ample meeting space, conference rooms, and a snack bar where those in recovery can fellowship and gain strength from other members in the recovery community.

In many cases, Club East is a person’s initial contact with the recovery community; here they meet and gain support from others in similar situations who share their experience, strength, and hope.

Club East is supported by membership, although by far most who benefit from our endeavors are not members. Frequently, however, after experiencing and maintaining a clean and sober lifestyle, many do become members. Additionally, any person who is in sympathy with the philosophy and objective of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous may be considered eligible for membership. The Club essentially supports itself by charging a minimal fee to groups who meet at the facility. The Club also earns income through its snack bar, and offers recovery-related literature.

the twelve steps

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God, as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

the twelve traditions

  1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon A.A. unity.
  2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority—a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.
  3. The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.
  4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole.
  5. Each group has but one primary purpose—to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.
  6. An A.A. group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the A.A. name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property, and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.
  7. Every A.A. group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.
  8. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever non-professional, but our service centers may employ special workers.
  9. A.A., as such, ought never be organized, but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.
  10. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the A.A. name ought never be drawn into public controversy.
  11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.
  12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.

12 thoughts on “who we are

  1. Lisa Neumann

    I like your blog—a lot. I can see, clearly, that Creator gave my humor to you. Funny funny stuff. Laughing out loud–whilst alone in my office. Happy travels- to all of us. LN

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    1. greg w Post author

      Thanks so much for your gracious words, Lisa! Still working all the bugs out as we go along, and it’s been a few years since I’ve been blogging. But being clean & sober for a shade over 4 years now has brought me to the point of trying to do something a little constructive with my time. Hopefully, this may be it. We’ll find out, won’t we?

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    1. greg w Post author

      Thanks so much, Paige. I love your blog and — seeing as how it’s so much easier to get forgiveness than permission — have taken the liberty of reposting your amazing little offering on the need for fellowship and community within AA. Bless you for your sensitive nature and grasp on truth.

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      1. greg w Post author

        Gee whiz… put it in the context of the site. It’s AA. It’s not as though I expect you to spell your name correctly or anything. Keeping the bar pretty low for club members here. 🙂

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  2. Steve

    WOW!
    Finally just a click and Club East can be found in cyberspace!
    What a great Web Site. Well done Greg!
    Many Thanks for all that you do for sure!

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  3. fern

    Did you ever see the irony in your blog about recovery showing a Google map of your location with a nearby “beer fountain” as a landmark? 🙂

    I always like your postings — good work!

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    Reply
    1. greg w Post author

      Right from Day One. It’s a club that keeps changing ownership. When we give people directions to Club East on the phone, it’s pretty easy to tell them to turn north on Ritter Ave at the bar.

      Thanks so much for your comment. I’ve been keeping something of a low profile lately. Joy’s mother — my mother-in-law for the past 28 years — died rather suddenly last week and things have been quite hectic here. I expect to be blogging again in the next day or two. Would actually like to post something about it all, but it may be a bit soon.

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      1. fern

        Sorry to hear about your M-I-L. Sudden losses can be especially difficult. My father died unexpectedly at the age of 52, of a massive heart attack. I was 20 and it hit me like a ton of bricks. I send sympathy and prayers to your wife’s family and you.

        I have been a bit absent myself and not keeping up with my blog reading. I want to get back to that routine!

        Hugs,

        Fern

        Liked by 1 person

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