one in a series

God is best found

I have always believed this to be true.

Advertisements

repost: love yourself now

via Shawna Rae at a sober miracle comes a post well-worth reading. Again. And again. Powerful, powerful stuff straight from the heart. She was in a dreadful place emotionally and psychologically, struggling, as she said, “…under the weight of guilt and shame because I had, once again, despite all of my resolve and great intentions, had too much to drink.” So she decided to punish herself by journaling.

As I lay on the bed, pouring my self-loathing onto the page, I suddenly felt the unmistakable presence of someone surrounding me with love … some wayward angel sent to comfort lost causes. But the feeling was powerful … much stronger than I’d felt before. The loving energy overwhelmed me, running through my mind and down into my hand holding the pen.

Love yourself now, the presence urged. I felt a wave of compassion wash over me, and I was overcome with the meaning behind the words.

In a heartfelt post on her highly subscribable blog, Shawna proceeds to expound on what it means to do that very thing. It’s a significant part of her healing, just as we can make it a part of ours. I’ll leave it to you to step over to Shawna’s place and take it all in.

daily reflection: protection for all

At the personal level, anonymity provides protection for all members from identification as alcoholics, a safeguard often of special importance to newcomers. At the level of press, radio, TV, and films, anonymity stresses the equality in the Fellowship of all members by putting the brake on those who might otherwise exploit their A.A. affiliation to achieve recognition, power, or personal gain.

— “UNDERSTANDING ANONYMITY,” p. 5

Attraction is the main force in the Fellowship of A.A. The miracle of continuous sobriety of alcoholics within A.A. confirms this fact every day. It would be harmful if the Fellowship promoted itself by publicizing, through the media of radio and TV, the sobriety of well-known public personalities who became members of A.A. If these personalities happened to have slips, outsiders would think our movement is not strong and they might question the veracity of the miracle of the century. Alcoholics Anonymous is not anonymous, but its members should be.