daily reflection: a day’s plan

On awakening let us think about the twenty-four hours ahead. We consider our plans for the day. Before we begin, we ask God to direct our thinking, especially asking that it be divorced from self-pity, dishonest or self-seeking motives.

— ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 86

Every day I ask God to kindle within me the fire of His love, so that love, burning bright and clear, will illuminate my thinking and permit me to better do His will. Throughout the day, as I allow outside circumstances to dampen my spirits, I ask God to sear my consciousness with the awareness that I can start my day over any time I choose; a hundred times, if necessary.

Daily Reflection 09/08/2016

8
September
“WE ASKED HIS PROTECTION”
We asked His protection and care with complete abandon.
— ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 59

I could not manage my life alone. I had tried that road and failed. My “ultimate sin” dragged me down to the lowest level I have ever reached and, unable even to function, I accepted the fact that I desperately needed help. I stopped fighting and surrendered entirely to God.

Only then did I start growing! God forgave me. A Higher Power had to have saved me, because the doctors doubted that I would survive. I have forgiven myself now and I enjoy a freedom I have never before experienced. I’ve opened my heart and mind to Him. The more I learn, the less I know — a humbling fact — but I sincerely want to keep growing. I enjoy serenity, but only when I entrust my life totally to God. As long as I am honest with myself and ask for His help, I can maintain this rewarding existence.

Just for today, I strive to live His will for me — soberly.

I thank God that today I can choose not to drink.

Today, life is beautiful!

Daily Reflection 09/07/2016

7
September
“OUR SIDE OF THE STREET”
We are there to sweep off our side of the street, realizing that nothing worth while can be accomplished until we do so, never trying to tell him what he should do. His faults are not discussed. We stick to our own.
— ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, pp. 77-78
I made amends to my dad soon after I quit drinking. My words fell on deaf ears since I had blamed him for my troubles. Several months later I made amends to my dad again. This time I wrote a letter in which I did not blame him nor mention his faults. It worked, and at last I understood! My side of the street is all that I’m responsible for and — thanks to God and A.A. — it’s clean for today.

Daily Reflection 08/25/2016

25

August

THE GIFT OF BONDING
Relieve me of the bondage of self, that I may better do Thy will.
— ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 63
Many times in my alcoholic state, I drank to establish a bond between myself and others, but I succeeded only in establishing the bondage of alcoholic loneliness. Through the A.A. way of life, I have received the gift of bonding—with those who were there before me, with those who are there now, and with those yet to come. For this gracious gift from God, I am forever grateful.

IMPACT HIRING JOB FAIR

So we all know that alcoholism and addiction is a behavioral disease. To help maintain an active recovery then necessary behavioral changes must happen.

Some of these changes often include employment. One thing I was really bad at within my addiction was being reliable. Reliable to get to work, reliable to be at a family event, reliability as a whole.

What is nice about employment in your active recovery is it can help keep yourself honest and accountable. I’ll also say that I, as an active recovery addict, seem to be more motivated and determined than others that I work with. This is not to say they do bad work or lack motivation, it just means that I am aware that I have a little extra “oomph” when it comes to my day-to-day. That “oomph” is my recovery. I wake up every day trying to be better than I was the day before. What else could be more beneficial to an employer?

With that we would like to update you on the IMPACT HIRING EVENT taking place on AUGUST 24th,2016 from 9AM-12PM. This is located at 1213 N Arlington INDPLS, IN 46219 on the 1st floor.

Companies such as Kroger, Xerox, FedEx, and many many more will be conducting hiring interviews. Me and Big Jim G were talking today about our experiences in recovery in the work place. I got my “second chance” by means of a downtown restaurant and ran with it. We all need a second chance at times, this may be that opportunity for you.

Here is the brochure. As always if you need us, we are here. All you have to do is call or come. God Bless

08/17/2016 Reflection

17
August
RIGHTING THE HARM
In many instances we shall find that though the harm done others has not been great, the emotional harm we have done ourselves has.
— TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 79
Have you ever thought that the harm you did a business associate, or perhaps a family member, was so slight that it really didn’t deserve an apology because they probably wouldn’t remember it anyway? If that person, and the wrong done to him, keeps coming to mind, time and again, causing an uneasy or perhaps guilty feeling, then I put that person’s name at the top of my “amends list,” and become willing to make a sincere apology, knowing I will feel calm and relaxed about that person once this very important part of my recovery is accomplished.

Daily Reflection 08/09/16

9
August
“. . . OF ALL PERSONS WE HAD HARMED”
. . . and became willing to make amends to them all.
— TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 77

One of the key words in the Eighth Step is the word all. I am not free to select a few names for the list and to disregard others. It is a list of all persons I have harmed. I can see immediately that this Step entails forgiveness because if I’m not willing to forgive someone, there is little chance I will place his name on the list. Before I placed the first name on my list, I said a little prayer: “I forgive anyone and everyone who has ever harmed me at any time and under any circumstances.”

It is well for me to contemplate a small, but very significant, two-letter word every time the Lord’s Prayer is said. The word is as. I ask, “Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.” In this case, as means, “in the same manner.” I am asking to be forgiven in the same manner that I forgive others. As I say this portion of the prayer, if I am harboring hatred or resentment,I am inviting more resentment, when I should be calling on the spirit of forgiveness.